Skin Cancer

Skin cancer

It is possible to find skin cancer early. This cancer begins where we can see it. The first sign may be a slowly growing bump, a changing mole, or a dry and scaly rough patch.

When treated before it spreads, most skin cancers can be cured. Even melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can spread quickly, is curable when treated early.

The key to finding skin cancer early is to know your skin. The following pictures show you some of the many ways that skin cancer can appear on the skin. If you notice a spot or lump that is growing, bleeding, or changing, you should make an appointment to see a dermatologist.

Skin cancer: Signs and symptoms

The most common warning sign of skin cancer is a change to your skin.

And the most common change is something growing on your skin. This growth can appear on the skin in many ways. The following explains the signs (what you see) and symptoms (what you feel) of the most common types of skin cancer.

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC)

This is the most common type of skin cancer. It most often appears on skin that gets lot of sun, such as the face, scalp, neck, hands, and arms. You will find BCCs on other parts of the body, too. It can appear on parts of the body that did not get lots of sun, such as the genitals.

BCC often grows slowly. It may look like a:

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)

This is a very common type of skin cancer. It often appears on skin that got lots of sun, such as an ear, face, bald scalp, neck, or arm. But it can appear elsewhere — even inside the mouth, on the lip, or on the genitals. 

Too much sun is often the cause, but it is not the only cause. SCC can appear on skin that was badly burned, had lots of radiation (such as x-rays), or was exposed to strong chemicals.

SCC often has a reddish color. Without treatment, it can grow deeply. If this happens, the cancer can spread to other parts of the body. This can be deadly. SCC often looks like a:

Melanoma

Know where you have moles on your skin! Melanoma often appears in an existing mole or looks like a new mole. By knowing where you have moles on your skin, you can find melanoma when it first appears. When treated early, melanoma is often curable. 

Here’s what to looks for:

Skin cancer: Who gets and causes

Who gets skin cancer?

Anyone can get skin cancer. Even people who have skin of color get this cancer. Bob Marley, a musician from Jamaica, developed melanoma on his foot. Most people who get skin cancer, however, have lighter skin.

Sun and indoor tanning are the leading causes of skin cancer.

People who are more likely to get skin cancer: 

If this exposure was years ago, a person still has an increased risk. Even if the exposure did not last long, such as lying out for a few summers, there is a greater risk.

Risk factors for skin cancer

Scientists have found that the following increases a person’s risk for getting skin cancer.

Skin: A person’s skin type and the moles on one’s skin affect the person’s risk for getting skin cancer. The risk increases when the person has: 

Family: When a close blood relative has (or had) skin cancer, a person’s risk of getting skin cancer rises. A close blood relative is a parent, brother, sister, or child. 

Medical history: Having (or having had) any of the following puts a person at greater risk for getting skin cancer: 

Receiving an organ transplant greatly increases the risk of developing skin cancer. 

Exposure to chemicals: People exposed to any of the following have a much higher risk of skin cancer:  

Tobacco: Smoking or chewing tobacco may increase the risk of getting squamous cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer, in the mouth or throat.

Skin cancer: Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome

How do dermatologists diagnose skin cancer?

To diagnose skin cancer, a dermatologist looks at the skin. A dermatologist will carefully examine growths, moles, and dry patches.

To get a better look, a dermatologist may use a device called a dermoscope. The device shines light on the skin. It magnifies the skin. This helps the dermatologist to see pigment and structures in the skin.

If a dermatologist finds something that looks like skin cancer, the dermatologist will remove it (or part of it). The removed skin will be sent to a lab. Your dermatologist may call this a biopsy. Skin cancer cannot be diagnosed without a biopsy.

A biopsy is quick, safe, and easy for a dermatologist to perform. A biopsy should not cause anxiety. The discomfort and risks are minimal.

How do dermatologists treat skin cancer?

There are many treatments for skin cancer. A dermatologist selects treatment after considering the following:

After considering the above, your dermatologist will choose 1 or more of the following treatments for skin cancer. 

Surgical treatment: When treating skin cancer, the goal is to remove all of the cancer. When the cancer has not spread, this is often possible. To remove skin cancer, the following surgical treatment may be used:

Excision: To perform this, the dermatologist numbs the skin and then surgically cuts out the skin cancer and a small amount of normal-looking skin. This normal-looking skin is called a margin. There are different types of excision. Most excisions can be performed in a dermatologist’s office.

Mohs surgery: A dermatologist who has completed additional medical training in Mohs surgery performs this procedure. Once a dermatologist completes this training, the dermatologist is called a Mohs surgeon. 

Mohs surgery begins with the surgeon removing the visible part of the skin cancer. Because cancer cells are not visible to the naked eye, the surgeon also removes some skin that looks normal but may contain cancer cells.

This part of the surgery is performed one layer at a time. After removing a layer of skin, it is prepared so that the surgeon can examine it under a microscope and look for cancer cells. 

If the surgeon sees cancer cells, the surgeon removes another layer of skin. This layer-by-layer approach continues until the surgeon no longer finds cancer cells. In most cases, Mohs surgery can be completed within a day or less. The cure rate for skin cancer is high when Mohs surgery is used.

Curettage and electrodesiccation: This surgical procedure may be used to treat small basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers. 

It involves scraping the tumor with a curette (a surgical instrument shaped like a long spoon) and then using an electric needle to gently cauterize (burn) the remaining cancer cells and some normal-looking tissue. This scraping and cauterizing process is typically repeated 3 times. The wound tends to heal without stitches. 

Sometimes, curettage is used alone.

Other treatments: Surgical treatment is not right for every case of skin cancer. Some patients cannot undergo surgery. Sometimes, surgery cannot remove all of the cancer, and more treatment is used to help get rid of the cancer. If the skin cancer is caught very early, surgery may not be necessary.

Other treatments for skin cancer are:

What outcome can someone with skin cancer expect?

If it is caught early and properly treated, skin cancer can be cured. Even melanoma, which can be deadly, has a cure rate of almost 100 percent when treated early. 

Even if you get a clean bill of health, you need to continue to see your dermatologist. Once a person gets skin cancer, the risk of getting another skin cancer is higher. Sometimes skin cancer returns. Your dermatologist will tell you how often you should return for checkups. 

Without early treatment, the outcome is not as favorable. Skin cancer can grow deeply. Removing the cancer can mean removing muscle and even bone. Reconstructive surgery may be needed after the surgery to remove the skin cancer. And skin cancer can spread. 

If the cancer spreads, treatment can be difficult. Treatment may not cure cancer that spreads.

Skin cancer: Tips for preventing and finding

Dermatologists share these tips with their patients. These tips can help you prevent skin cancer — or find skin cancer early when treatment can cure the skin cancer. 

Preventing skin cancer

Never use a tanning bed or sun lamp. These can cause skin cancer. Research shows that using a tanning bed increases your risk of getting melanoma by 75 percent.

Wear sunscreen and lip balm every day. The sun is a known cause of skin cancer. Every day, before you go outside, apply sunscreen to all skin that will be bare (face, ears, hands, neck, etc.). Apply lip balm to your lips. Be sure to use sunscreen that:

Protects against UVA and UVB rays. The label must say broad-spectrum or UVA/UVB protection. If it does not say either, find another product.

Has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30.

Wear clothes that protect you from UV rays. A jean jacket offers great UV protection. A white t-shirt does not. Any clothing that you can hold up to bright light and see through does not offer the protection you need. 

To boost the UV protection that your clothes offer, you may want to use a UV protectant. You wash this protectant into your clothes. To use, you simply add it to the wash cycle. 

Wear sunglasses that offer UV protection every day. Melanoma can develop in the eyes.

Try not to spend time outdoors between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. This is when the sun is strongest.